Human Rabies in Kumasi: A Growing Public Health Concern
Issue Cover Image (Vol. 1 No. 1 2017)
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Keywords

Rabies
rabies vaccine
Ghana

How to Cite

Laryea, D. O., Owusu Ofori, R., Arthur, J., Agyemang, E. O., & Spangenberg, K. (2017). Human Rabies in Kumasi: A Growing Public Health Concern. African Journal of Current Medical Research, 1(1). https://doi.org/10.31191/afrijcmr.v1i1.9

Abstract

Rabies is a source of concern for Public Health Officials. It is known to have a case fatality of 100% worldwide. Of all cases reported, 95% occurred in Africa and Asia put together. The Ghana Office of Rabies in West Africa (RIWA) suggests that the numbers in Ghana maybe underreported due to ineffective surveillance systems. The study therefore reviewed medical records of all suspected rabies cases and case-based forms filed by Disease Control Officers to the Disease Surveillance Unit of the Ghana Health Service. Twenty-one cases of suspected human rabies cases were reported in the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) from January 2013 to January 2015. A little of 50% of cases were males. A third of the cases did not receive PEP though they reported to a health facility. On the average cases were reported 2 months after the exposure.  This study also reported 100% fatality with 60% dying within 24 hours post admission. It is recommended that there is effort aimed at Public Education and also to control stray dogs. Governments are also admonished to make available PEPs at health facilities.
https://doi.org/10.31191/afrijcmr.v1i1.9
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References

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